Money Matters - Simplified

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Is This Highflier Due for a Crash?

 I'm a believer in growth stocks. As an analyst for our Motley Fool Rule Breakers service, I think you should be a believer, too. But even I have to admit some growth stories are bogus, hence this regular series.

 

The Motley Fool's Weekly Editors' Picks

 Fools were out and about this week in an investing world jampacked with actions and ideas. Here are three articles you might find useful as you decide how to invest your money.

 

Is Williams-Sonoma's Stock a Bargain by the Numbers?

 Numbers can lie -- yet they're the best first step in determining whether a stock is a buy. In this series, we use some carefully chosen metrics to size up a stock's true value based on the following clues:

  • The current price multiples.
  • The consistency of past earnings and cash flow.
  • The amount of growth we can expect.

Does Advanced Micro Devices Measure Up?

Margins matter. The more Advanced Micro Devices (NYSE: AMD) keeps of each buck it earns in revenue, the more money it has to invest in growth, fund new strategic plans, or (gasp!) distribute to shareholders. Healthy margins often separate pretenders from the best stocks in the market.  That's why I check on my holdings' margins at least once a quarter. I'm looking for the absolute numbers, comparisons with sector peers and competitors, and any trend that may tell me how strong Advanced Micro Devices' competitive position could be.

5 Huge Stocks to Profit From 5 Huge Investment Lessons

 I may make you groan in a minute. But stay with me. By the end of this article, I will give you five stock picks that I've personally invested in.

 

The Fool Sits Down with Cirrus Logic CEO Jason Rhode

Recently, Rule Breakers analyst Sean Sun and I had the chance to talk with Cirrus Logic (Nasdaq: CRUS) CEO Jason Rhode, whose company produces a wide range of audio and energy components. Below is the lightly edited second part of our chat, where we discuss how the company managed to build its relationship with Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL), which contributed 44% of last quarter's revenue. Also, we examine how the company differentiates itself to compete against a larger set of rivals, which include semiconductor giants like Texas Instruments (NYSE: TXN), STMicroelectronics (NYSE: STM) and Maxim Integrated Products (NYSE: MXIM).

Toyota finds traction in tough year

Toyota City, Japan -- Japanese automaker Toyota Motor Corp. said its fortunes have changed dramatically as it posted a $1.1 billion profit in its fiscal second quarter.

The company's fiscal year begins April 1. The company, which was plagued by recalls this year and lost money in the fiscal year ending March 2010, said it had made a profit of $3.3 billion April through September, USA Today reported Saturday.

FoxBusiness.com said Toyota had recalled 11 million cars in the past 12 months, including 135,000 announced this week. But the company said sales rose by 585,000 to 3.7 million vehicles in the first half of its fiscal year compared with the same period of the previous year.

Is O'Reilly Automotive's Profit Trend Your Friend?

 Margins matter. The more O'Reilly Automotive (Nasdaq: ORLY) keeps of each buck it earns in revenue, the more money it has to invest in growth, fund new strategic plans, or (gasp!) distribute to shareholders. Healthy margins often separate pretenders from the best stocks in the market.  That's why I check on my holdings' margins at least once a quarter. I'm looking for the absolute numbers, comparisons to sector peers and competitors, and any trend that may tell me how strong O'Reilly Automotive's competitive position could be.

 

The Fool Looks Ahead

 The new trading week kicks off with Synovus Financial(NYSE: SNV) reporting on Monday. The market sees a substantially smaller quarterly deficit out of the regional banker. Synovus brought in a new CEO this month, so the conference call promises to be an interesting one.

Profit From the Next Billion Internet Users

Motley Fool guest contributor Brad Hessel manages an investment advising service in North Carolina. He has previously worked in investment banking, and has founded or co-founded a computer game design company, a CASE tool software company, and a knowledge management consulting practice.