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Astronaut sends Twitpic of Perseid meteor from space

Garan posted the picture on his Twitter account and stated, “What a "Shooting Star" looks like #FromSpace Taken yesterday during Perseids Meteor Shower Thanks @JakeGaran 4 camera settings.”

As a sky watcher, you might have observed the Perseid meteor shower blaze the night sky this weekend, but ever wondered what the light show appears like from heavens?

A NASA astronaut Ron Garan has captured an unusual photograph of the Perseid meteor heading hurtling towards the Earth's atmosphere from the International Space Station's (ISS) window Saturday.

Garan posted the picture on his Twitter account and stated, “What a "Shooting Star" looks like #FromSpace Taken yesterday during Perseids Meteor Shower Thanks @JakeGaran 4 camera settings.”

Though the image captured by Garan doesn't appear much different from the dazzling show viewed from Earth, there is one major difference: in case of the astronaut, the meteor is moving away from him, and for the terrestrial sky gazers, meteors fall towards them.

Garan, who went into space in April, is nearing the end of his six month stay at ISS.

From an average of 30 shooting stars an hour on Friday morning, the number increased to 45-60 shooting stars an hour by Friday night and Saturday morning, according to the International Meteor Organization.

Dazzling show of shooting stars
This year the Perseid meteor shower peaked late Friday through early Saturday.

Though the the full moon light eclipsed the shower, many sky watchers were still able to witness the cosmic fireworks late Friday evening and Saturday morning.

From an average of 30 shooting stars an hour on Friday morning, the number increased to 45-60 shooting stars an hour by Friday night and Saturday morning, according to the International Meteor Organization.

For those you have missed the 'shooting stars this weekend, there is still some more to come, as the spectacle will last till Aug. 24.

The sky gazers will be able view at least 5-10 meteors per hour in coming days.

About Perseid meteor shower
Being observed for about 2000 years ago, the Perseid meteor shower is caused by the debris from comet Swift-Tuttle.

During this time of the year, the comet's debris, comprising of ice and dust, coincides with the Earth's obrit and burns up in the atmosphere, giving way to “falling stars” phenomenon.

As Perseid meteor shower is witnessed around Aug. 10, the martyrdom date of St. Lawrence, some devout believers call these meteors the “tears of St. Lawrence.”