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Fruit juices have more sugar than believed--study

According to lead researcher Dr Hans-Peter Kubis, professor at the University of Bangor, when the fruits are squeezed to extract juice, their sweetness gets concentrated.

Is fruit juice a part of your daily regime? Think twice before reaching out for that quick portion of fruit, as a new study states it is too sugary to be included in five-meals-a-day diet plan.

Debunking the belief that fruit juices are an essential part of a healthy balanced diet, the researchers at Bangor University, in North Wales, claim that such drinks are harmful, and should be avoided.

Many a times, people substitute juice for whole fruits but this is a mistake, as this could lead them to developing a sweet tooth.

Fruit juices may encourage high sugar intake
According to lead researcher Dr. Hans-Peter Kubis, professor at the University of Bangor, when fruits are squeezed to extract juice, their sweetness gets concentrated.

One study found when the fruit is squeezed properly, it can contain up to five teaspoons of sugar per glass. This is equivalent to two-thirds of the quantity found in a can of soda.

Meanwhile, another study by University of Leeds researchers states that dried fruits are as rich in antioxidants, polyphenols and nutrients as their fresh counterparts, and they can fight against cancer, and heart problems.

“I'd also question the wisdom of including fruit juice in the five-a-day message,” stated Dr. Kubis.

“Fruit juice is higher in sugars than people realize and they are likely to encourage drinking too much sugar,” he added.

Considering the fact that high sugar intake from fruit juices may contribute to obesity and adversely affect blood sugar levels in the body, researchers recommend eating whole fruits and vegetables instead.

Dried fruits: a healthy option
Meanwhile, another study by University of Leeds researchers states that dried fruits are as rich in antioxidants, polyphenols and nutrients as their fresh counterparts, and they can fight against cancer, and heart problems.

Researchers suggest that dried fruits can make up for one of the five-a-day healthy foods.

"We are not saying you should get all five of your five-a-day from dried fruit but you could definitely get at least one,” stated Professor Gary Williamson of the University of Leeds.

The research was presented at World Nut & Dried Fruit Congress in Budapest, Hungary.