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Google celebrates Mother's Day: flower for moms

The present day celebration dates back to early 20th century when Anna Marie Jarvis made efforts to establish Mother's Day, following death of her mother Ann Jarvis on May 9, 1905.

On the occasion of Mother’s Day, Google is wishing all the mothers with its doodle, a purple flower.

Google has been commemorating this occasion for years and every time the doodle marks this day with a flower.

Top search engine Google alters its logo on special events, for instance, birthday of famous personalities, anniversaries, and major events: Olympics, FIFA World Cup Final, First World Fair, and important days.

By clicking on the logo on such days, the browser can discover all the links related to the occasion.

History behind Mother’s Day
Way back in 1870, Julia Ward Hove, the renowned author of ‘The Battle Hymn of the Republic,’ took an initiative to motivate the women to celebrate Mother’s Day.

Anna trademarked the phrases “second Sunday in May” and “Mother’s Day” in 1912 and even formed Mother’s Day International Association.

The social activist's Mother’s Day Proclamation was a reaction to the homicide during the American Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War.

By issuing the proclamation, Julia appealed to women to step forward and join the league as she believed that women can structure their societies aptly, at the political level.

However, she failed in accomplishing her goals as her initiative did not get enough coverage.

The woman behind Mother’s Day
The present day celebration dates back to early 20th century when Anna Marie Jarvis made efforts to establish Mother's Day, following death of her mother Ann Jarvis on May 9, 1905.

Anna’s endeavors got acknowledged by people after she was supported by Philadelphia Merchant John Wanamaker.

Anna continued her campaign until President Woodrow Wilson announced it as a national holiday in 1914. Later, she strove to get the day declared as an international holiday.

She promoted this day in order to fulfill her mother’s dream of making it a celebration day for all the mothers.

Anna trademarked the phrases “second Sunday in May” and “Mother’s Day” in 1912 and even formed Mother’s Day International Association.

Anna opposed the commercialization of Mother’s Day
After making efforts to declare Mother’s Day as a national holiday, Anna Jarvis protested against the commercialization of this holiday.

She was against people purchasing greeting cards rather than writing personal letters. Anna was even arrested in 1948 for hampering peace by opposing against the advertisement of Mother’s Day for business purposes.

She died in 1948 and wished “she would have never started the day because it became so out of control.”

In last one month, online searches for Mother’s Day flowers, poems, gifts, cards and many more items have surged.

In the United States, Mother’s Day is one of the biggest day for sales of flowers and greeting cards.