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Russian military satellite mistaken for UFO

Alien life believers were quick to conclude that they eventually have proof for the existence of the other-worldly creatures. (Photo Courtesy: ekamag)

Imagine seeing a bright and spectacular UFO with excitement only to realize later that it is nothing but a man-made satellite.

Similar was the experience of hundreds of Russians when they spotted a dazzling array of lights in the sky over the Ural Mountains in the city of Ekaterinburg.

Ekaterinburg happens to be the biggest city in the Ural Mountains.

Sight amazes space watchers, bloggers
The amazing sight triggered a flurry of excitement and discussions on social blogs and YouTube. What was a local Russian spectacle soon caught the attention of space watchers all across the globe.

It was not until Russia Today’s Channel finally picked up the story and cleared the confusion that people eventually realized that what they had taken to be an alien starship was actually a Russian satellite.

Alien life believers were quick to conclude that they eventually have proof for the existence of the other-worldly creatures.

Bloggers posted photos of the so-called ‘UFO’ and YouTube users were also quick to upload videos of the shining object.

Some of those who saw the shining flying object said it was similar to northern lights, a natural display of light that occurs in polar regions because of the collision of charged particles moved by the Earth’s magnetic field.

However, Ekaterinburg happens to be too far south for such a natural phenomenon to take place.

Just a man-made satellite
It was not until Russia Today’s Channel finally picked up the story and cleared the confusion that people eventually realized that what they had taken to be an alien starship was actually a Russian satellite.

Russia Today’s Channel posted a video of the shining satellite with a small transcript explaining the origin of the ‘UFO.’

“It was a night when many thought the great question on alien life had finally been answered. Big glowing ball with four extending tails whizzed about the sky over the Russian Urals. The sight attracted mass attention when the first messages and spectacular pictures quickly appeared in blogs. But it turns out 'life from Mars' was actually a Meridian military communications satellite being blasted off into orbit,” read the transcript.

The transcript further stated that it was the fourth such satellite launched by Russia to replace the Molniya system.

Currently, Russia has 100 such satellites moving around the earth.

The Moscow based new agency RIA Novosti officially announced on its website that a Soyuz-2.1a rocket carrying the Meridian 4 satellite had lifted off from the Plesetsk space center in northern Russia at 09.41 pm Moscow time on Wednesday.