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Facebook improves security, safety features

Facebook will ask users to enter a code whenever they log in from a new device to affirm that they are the original users.

Facebook, world's top second social networking site, launched new security and safety features Tuesday.

Facebook updates come a day after security firm Sophos issued a letter to the social networking site, alleging that Facebook lacked pivotal security features.

Facebook's engineering director, Arturo Bejar wrote on the blog post, “Safety has always been a social experience: as friends and family, we look out for each other and pass along advice to help each other stay safe. Safety on Facebook works the same way.

“By keeping each other informed, people make Facebook a more trusted environment.”

Security, safety tools
Facebook, which caters to more than 600 million users, has now redesigned its Family Safety Center, where parents, teacher and teens can cite possible ways of interacting and using Facebook safely.

“We think that social solutions to safety will become increasingly important to using the web. Tools like social reporting will help make our community even stronger, and we encourage you to use them.”--Arturo Bejar, engineering director of Facebook.

Also, the social networking site will soon provide a free downloading guide for teachers, written by safety experts Linda Fogg Phillips, B.J. Fogg and Derek Baird.

Facebook's two-factor authentication feature
Apart from the aforementioned features, Facebook also revealed a two-factor authentication feature to avoid unofficial access of accounts.

Facebook will ask users to enter a code whenever they log in from a new device to affirm that they are the original users.

The HTTPS feature, embarked in January, shields the account of a user if he/she is unaware of the network's security or is accessing the account from public wi-fi.

Presently, the team is also augmenting the HTTPS service so that if a member is using a non-HTTPS feature, the session is automatically switched to HTTPS.

Facebook has also introduced a social reporting tool. This will help users inform friends and family members about anything they don't like or consider spam.

“Safety and child psychology experts tell us that online issues are frequently a reflection of what is happening offline. By encouraging people to seek help from friends, we hope that many of these situations can be resolved face to face. The impact has been encouraging, and we're now expanding social reporting to other major sections of Facebook, including Profiles, Pages and Groups,” said Bejar.

“We think that social solutions to safety will become increasingly important to using the web. Tools like social reporting will help make our community even stronger, and we encourage you to use them,” Bejar added.

Facebook security tools fails to impress Sophos
Though the social networking giant thinks the new updates will secure accounts of users, security firm Sophos is not convinced.

Finding the features less impressive, Sophos suggested Facebook certain alterations in its security settings through a letter.

They asked Facebook not to share the information about the users unless the users agree.

Only third party developers should be permitted to upload the applications in the account.

Besides, they even proposed that the HTTPS connection should become active by default, as there are certain features in the settings about which users might not be aware.