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High school baseball players kill chicks to improve game

The unnamed minors have been kicked off from the team for the rest of the year, and “charged with cruelty to livestock animals.”

Two high school baseball players in Texas are in trouble with the law for apparently killing baby chickens as a part of the superstitious ritual to improve their performance in game.

The Western Hills High School teens, ages 15 and 16, allegedly slaughtered two baby chicks at their school's baseball field on March 17 or 18.

Police in Benbrook, Texas, probing the reports of animal cruelty, said that the two school boys "engaged in acts that caused the death of two baby chickens.

“It appears that superstition relating to a slump in baseball performance could have played a part.”

This is not the first time that students have indulged in animal cruelty. In a previous incident, five boys from Fort Worth school district were disciplined for throwing “baby chicks and live fish” during a “pep rally.”

Teens charged
The unnamed minors have been kicked off from the team for the rest of the year, and “charged with cruelty to livestock animals.”

The charge could lead to jail felony ranging from 180 days to two years imprisonment.

Further, it could also include a fine up to $10,000, stated Benbrook police Sgt. John Van Ness.

Act inspired from movies?
The school's coach Bobby McIntire didn't get a chance to speak to the boys about why they indulged in animal slaughter.

As the baseball game is associated with many superstitions, the boys might have got the idea from movies, he added.

In the movie 'Major League,' Pedro Cerrano, portraying a baseball player, wants to sacrifice a live chicken in order to improve their game.

Even in the film, 'Bull Durham,' Kevin Costner who stars as 'Crash' Davis is seen saying that they “need a live chicken to get the hex off Jose’s glove.”

Call for humane treatment of animals
This is not the first time that students have indulged in animal cruelty. In a previous incident, five boys from Fort Worth school district were disciplined for throwing “baby chicks and live fish” during a “pep rally.”

Considering these cases, Sandy Grambort, equine and livestock coordinator for the Humane Society of North Texas, expressed disappointment, and stressed on education about humane treatment of animals.

For these boys, “chicken comes from a plastic bag, and they may not understand that chickens are living creatures that feel pain and feel fear.”

Following the recent incident, People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has reached out to the school and stressed that it should set an animal-rights club on campus.