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Caffeine overdose kills a young Brit

The two spoonfuls of caffeine that Bedford consumed amounted to about 70 cans of Red Bull.

It has been well documented in many medical journals that drug or alcohol overdose can kill people. But can caffeine overdose be deadly? Well, it proved fatal for one British man who reportedly died from consuming too much caffeine back in April.

Caffeine is a naturally produced drug found in coffee and tea. It is mildly addictive drug which raises blood pressure, stimulates the kidneys, accelerates heart rate and breathing, and temporarily averts fatigue and tiredness.

It also makes one more alert and energetic. Today, caffeine can be found in a variety of consumer products like chocolate, coffee and most sodas.

Coffee could kill?
Unfortunately, this natural stimulant has killed a 23-year-old British man, who reportedly overdosed on caffeine powder he purchased on the internet, reports New York Daily News, citing reports in the British media.

Last week, according to AOL Health, it came to light that Michael Lee Bedford died after consuming spoonfuls of caffeine powder along with energy drinks at a party with friends.

The website reports that those two spoonfuls of caffeine that Bedford consumed amounted to about 70 cans of Red Bull.

That's why the powder he bought came with a warning to consume just one-sixteenth of a teaspoon at a time.

Soon after consuming the pure caffeine that he washed down with an energy drink, Bedford quickly got sick, threw up, began slurring his words, and collapsed.

Died in moments
According to Daily, a friend of the deceased told the Nottingham Evening Post exactly what happened on that fateful night party.

Soon after consuming the pure caffeine that he washed down with an energy drink, Bedford quickly got sick, threw up, began slurring his words, and collapsed.

"He was puking up blood and he was sweating really bad," the 17-year-old friend told the Post.

Though Bedford was rushed by ambulance to a local hospital, he died moments later swallowing the powder.

Who to blame?
Last week, Bedford’s tragic death was ruled accidental in an inquest, but his family blames the ease with which Bedford was able to get the product.

"This should serve as a warning that caffeine is so freely available on the Internet but so lethal if the wrong dosage is taken," Coroner Dr. Nigel Chapman said at the inquest.

The caffeine powder which was obtained over the internet comes with a warning label on it, saying only one-sixteenth of a teaspoon should be taken, but Bedford far exceeded that amount.

"He wasn't doing anything wrong, it was just the danger of the dose he took," said Chapman.

Easily availability of product disgusts family
"It makes me feel sick [that these products can be bought so easily]," his grandmother Glenis Noble told the Post. "I feel like it should be banned."

"I think there should be a warning on it saying it can kill," added his aunt Sue Burton.