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Tyra Banks faces lawsuit over 'sex addicted' teen's story

McClendon alleges the producers of the show failed to alert her about her daughter's scheduled appearance.

The U.S. supermodel and TV talk show host Tyra Banks is being sued by a Georgia woman who claims that her 15-year-old daughter appeared on an episode of Banks’ talk show without her consent.

The mother says TV producers should have alerted her to their plans to feature her teen daughter on 'The Tyra Banks Show' about sex addiction.

Georgia resident Beverly McClendon has filed a lawsuit in an Atlanta federal court earlier this month against the show’s host Tyra Banks, her producers, and Warner Bros. Entertainment.

No parental consent was given for the appearance
McClendon, a licensed social worker, claims in the lawsuit that her teenage daughter Jewel Ciera Washington was flown to New York City and featured on Banks’ program about sex addiction without parental permission, as reported by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The $3 million suit, filed on Oct. 8, claims producers of 'The Tyra Banks Show' failed to secure legal permission to feature the teenage girl on Banks' talk show about teen sex addicts, and by doing so they have violated Georgia state labor laws.

McClendon has urged for an injunction against any future airing of the program, which still appears in repeats on the CW network.

Girl was taken to NY without parents’ consent
The then 15-year-old Jewel Ciera responded to an open call on Banks show's website for self-proclaimed sex addicts in October 2009. Producers of the show later contacted her and invited her to appear as a guest on the show.

The teen was then picked up from her home in Georgia in a limo and flown to New York in November 2009, where she was put up in a hotel, all without her mother's knowledge, the complaint alleges.

McClendon alleges the producers of the show failed to alert her about her daughter's scheduled appearance.

Teen was paid to tell her story
McClendon also claims her daughter was paid for her appearance on the show, which promoted her as a “15-year-old sex addict.”

In her filed complaint, McClendon states her daughter suffered damages because the 2009 show "was undoubtedly watched by sexual deviants, perverts and pedophiles alike."

The complaint says the show was irresponsible and questions “the care of duty owed when producers of a TV program invite minors on air to speak about their sexual proclivity.”

Mom seeks millions in damage
McClendon has urged for an injunction against any future airing of the program, which still appears in repeats on the CW network.

McClendon is suing for violation of privacy and negligence, and seeking US$3 million- $1 million in compensatory damages and $2 million in punitive damages- from Banks, her producers and Warner Bros. Entertainment, saying they violated her daughter's right to privacy.