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Imitating Lady Gaga's 'big-eyed' look can be dangerous

No U.S. company is currently making the contacts that impart a doe-eyed look to the wearer. These lenses are illegal in the United States, still teens are getting them easily from internet.

More and more teen girls are going crazy about Lady Gaga style ‘big eyes.’ But they don’t know how much hazardous it can be for their health.

The cosmetic contact lenses which are currently being used by young women to imitate the pop star’s wide-eyed look she sported in her latest album are, in fact, dangerous, U.S. doctors have warned.

Pop superstar Gaga has sported big-eyed look in certain scenes of her "Bad Romance" music video which has inspired some young women to get contact lenses to mimic the effect.

Teens copying Gaga’s big-eyed effect
While Gaga’s huge eyes in the video may have been computer-generated, teens and youngsters are using specially made contact lenses to get those dramatic, anime-style eyes.

Manufactured by an Asian company, the eye contacts called ‘circle lenses’ make eyes appear larger because they not only cover the irises, but part of the whites of the eyes too.

No U.S. company is currently making the contacts that impart a doe-eyed look to the wearer. These lenses are illegal in the United States, still teens are getting them easily from internet.

Manufactured by an Asian company, the eye contacts called ‘circle lenses’ make eyes appear larger because they not only cover the irises, but part of the whites of the eyes, too.

Gaga-like big eyes means big danger
But doctors warn that teens should think twice to use so-called "circle lens" contact lenses to get Gaga-like huge, doe-eyed look, because they may cause inflammation, pain, and even blindness, according to CBS News.

"We have no control of where they're manufactured, what their processes are and they're not being fit and appropriately medically cared for by licensed eye doctors," says Dr. S. Barry Eiden, the Chair of the Contact Lens and Cornea Section of the American Optometric Association.

In a statement given Tuesday, the eye doctors' group American Academy of Ophthalmology said that it "would like to alert consumers to the hazards of buying any decorative lenses, including circle lenses, without a prescription. Any type of contact lens is a medical device that requires a prescription, proper fitting by an eye care professional and a commitment to proper care by the consumer," according to USA Today.

AAO warning and advice
The group also warned that "inflammation and pain can occur from improperly fitted, over-the-counter lenses and lead to more serious problems including corneal abrasions and blinding infections."

AAO advised people to get their contact lenses fitted by a trained professional, and that anyone who develops "pain, burning, redness, tearing or sensitivity to light while wearing any type of contact lenses," should immediately consult an ophthalmologist.

"Circle lenses" become a YouTube phenomenon
The colored circle lenses, worn widely in South Korea, Japan and Singapore, are readily available online without a prescription for around $20 to $30 a pair and are becoming much more widespread.

According to New York Daily News, makeup artist Michelle Phan, in a YouTube video called “Lady Gaga Bad Romance Look,” demonstrates how to get the “crazy, googly Lady Gaga eyes.” That video has been viewed nearly ten million times.