Money Matters - Simplified

Apps update: iPhone apps making news

 iPhone apps making news iPhone apps making news

From fetching bikini photos from the Facebook, managing your expenses and even keeping you aware of your legal rights, these smartphone apps have registered record downlaods

New at the istore:
Badabing
Weave
Dancers information

The Apple marketplace is flooded with hundreds of apps offering variant services. In an ocean of iPhone apps, 3 apps are gaining popularity and even criticism for different reasons.
Check them out

Badabing
Amidst booming iPhone apps being included on the Apple marketplace every day, a new app is on the verge of creating extensive controversy. Known as the Badabing, this app will fetch facebook photos and streamline the bikini ones!

That app has received widespread success with record downloads already registered. Though, it has brought much criticism for such as blemish concept.

Drew Olanoff wrote on TechCrunch Sunday that the app "made me feel really dirty when I downloaded it."

"Developers: Stop making apps like this," wrote commenter Steve Streza.

Charlie Kubal agreed. "Can't imagine Facebook being too pleased with this use of FBconnect. Would be surprised if they don't get their access revoked."

The app is expected to face legal notices soon.

Weave
The developers of much popular TurboTax are back! Weave, one of rare free apps on the store and with so much worth. The main screen is titled as the 'money screen' that lets you track your income and expenses more efficiently than anything else on the istore could.

Moreover,it helps you streamline your transactions and make associated evaluations. It also has a section to make necessary updates to your projects. The app keeps updated record of latest advancements in iOS 5 and iOS 6.

Dancer's information
The app serves the night club dancers in U.K. by letting them know their legal rights. Majority of dancers have complained lack of awareness about their occupation, labour clauses and significant other issues.

According to the research, 96% of the dancers did not pay into a pension and 90% had never had a contract. Moreover, 80 percent have never got a wage slip, holiday pay or sick pay. Almost 70 percent expressed displeasure of not being aware of what they would earn.

A majority said they felt safe in their workplace because of security staff, but didn't report incidents of violence, verbal harassment and unwanted touching from customers, the report said. Some women reported being stalked.

Dancers information meets their quests and makes them more aware of their rights against financial exploitation, abuse and unsafe situations.