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Toshiba shows off ultrabook at CES 2012

Toshiba’s ultrabook has a thickness of 0.78 inch, which is far less than conventional laptops.

Every year the CES exhibition sees a host of exciting and innovative products by hardware manufacturers.

This year at CES Toshiba unveiled its first 14-inch ultrabook to consumers.

An ultrabook is a term coined by Intel to denote thin and light laptops which strikingly resemble Macbook Air.

Intel is quite optimistic that ultrabooks will dominate over regular laptops in this decade, and has already predicted that 40 percent of all laptops sold by 2015 will be ultrabooks.

Most manufacturers are designing their ultrabooks to make them just as appealing and aesthetic to look at as a Macbook Air or Macbook Pro..

As light as a netbook, as powerful as a laptop
You can think of ultrabooks to be somewhere between a netbook and a laptop, and slightly thinner.

They promise an entire day of battery life, without any compromise in performance. Thanks to Intel’s efficient processors, ultrabooks are both powerful and long-lasting on a single charge.

The new 14-inch ultrabook introduced by Toshiba is more of an exception because most ultrabooks that have hit the news sport a 13.3-inch screen – quite similar to what you would find in a Macbook.

Nevertheless, a 14-inch screen means that the ultrabook would be larger and slightly thicker than the supposedly conventional razor-thin ultrabooks, and will have a standard set of ports including HDMI and Ethernet.

Toshiba’s ultrabook has a thickness of 0.78 inch, which is far less than conventional laptops.

Owing to its size, it sports a standard set of ports including HDMI, Ethernet, 3 USB ports (one happens to be USB 3.0), card slot and mic and headset ports.

Most ultrabooks have to let go of certain ports to maintain a thin profile. They also lack an optical drive, and it is true of Toshiba’s ultrabook as well. The screen resolution is 1366x786.

Copying the design of a Macbook Air
Most manufacturers are designing their ultrabooks to make them just as appealing and aesthetic to look at as a Macbook Air or Macbook Pro.

Many are even trying to outdo Apple in designing them, attempting to make the ultrabook as thin as it can possibly get.

The keyboard is chiclet, with the keys well separated and neatly laid out. There is a set of navigational keys on the far right, which is quite usual in Toshiba laptops.