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Coffee may up diabetes risk--study

James Lane, PhD, Duke University, stated that there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that caffeine consumption disrupts glucose metabolism, and can lead to Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

A hot cup of coffee might be the perfect way to kick start the day, but a new study warns that caffeinated drinks like coffee may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

Contrary to the previous studies that caffeine helps prevents diabetes, the research findings published in the inaugural issue of Journal of Caffeine Research: The International Multidisciplinary Journal of Caffeine Science' states that caffeinated drinks like coffee, tea and soft drinks might lead to T2DM or aggravate the disease in those who are already suffering from it.

Type 2 diabetes mellitus results when insulin receptors in the muscles, liver, and fat cells become less sensitive and responsive to actions of insulin. The pancreas secrete insulin but the body is partially or completely unable to use the insulin.

Caffeine impairs glucose tolerance
James Lane, PhD, Duke University, stated that there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that caffeine consumption disrupts glucose metabolism, and can lead to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Citing research done in the area, Lane added that 17 previous studies have shown that caffeine intake by healthy, non-diabetic adults can lead to “acute increase in insulin resistance or impairment of glucose tolerance,” thus resulting in T2DM.

The links that have been revealed between diabetes and the consumption of caffeine beverages are of monumental importance when it is acknowledged that more than 80 percent of the world's population consumes caffeine daily.”--Jack E. James, editor in chief of journal and of the National University of Ireland

Further, studies on diabetes patients have shown that caffeine “exaggerates the rise in glucose” and can result in “higher chronic glucose levels and impaired clinical control.”

Study findings useful
Jack E. James, editor in chief of journal and of the National University of Ireland, stated, "The links that have been revealed between diabetes and the consumption of caffeine beverages are of monumental importance when it is acknowledged that more than 80 percent of the world's population consumes caffeine daily.”

Nearly 220 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes.

“Dr. Lane's review of the topic gives the clearest account to date of what we know, what we don't know, and what needs to be done urgently,” he added.

Based on the findings, Lane calls for more studies and clinical trials to examine the effects of caffeine and know the potential benefits of eliminating caffeine from diet.