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Botox may help women with vaginal pains

Vaginal contraction or painful spasm is triggered by any stimulation near the vagina or even thought of any form of vaginal penetration.

Botox treatment has long been used in smoothening out the wrinkles and rejuvenating women, but now the same has been found helpful easing painful vaginal conditions, know as vaginismus.

In the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved trial, Botox treated vaginal spasms in all categories of women, confirmed Dr. Peter T. Pacik, a New Hampshire plastic surgeon, who led the clinical trial testing.

The researchers have found that botulinum Toxin A, an active ingredient in Dysport, a type of Botox, is effective in easing the vaginal contractions that hinders woman's ability to indulge in any form of vaginal penetration like sexual intercourse, tampon, finger, and GYN speculum exam.

It was found that women who underwent treatment were able to have pain-free intercourse within 2 to 6 weeks.

Botox treatment shows results
In September 2010, Dr. Pacik received the FDA approval to continue with his study that involved using “Botox and a long acting local anesthetic intravaginally” to treat the problem.

He was also granted approval from the institutional review board (IRB).

Dr. Pacik called the approvals "major victory for women suffering from vaginismus," adding that it would "enable woman to have one more treatment option and will help remove the veil of secrecy that surrounds vaginismus."

Before the treatment, the patients were counseled for three days.

“Most patients I treat are unable to consummate, unable to have a family” said Dr. Pacik.

It was found that women who underwent treatment were able to have pain-free intercourse within 2 to 6 weeks.

“When I inject them, I put them asleep. You would not be able to approach these people with a needle,” added Dr. Pacik, who has even authored a book titled 'When Sex Seems Impossible: Stories of Vaginismus & How You Can Achieve Intimacy.'

Similar study in past
This is not the first time that botox is being used to treat vaginiamus. In fact, this treatment dates back to 1997.

In 2004, a study was conducted on women in Iran who were suffering from vaginiamus. Dysport, a form of botox, was used.

One week after the procedure, 23 women were able to have vaginal examination. Of these, 18 indulged in satisfactory sexual intercourse, four had mild pain, and one was not bale to have intercourse due to husband's impotency.

Though the use of botox is not new, most surgeons, sex therapists and obstetricians are aware of this treatment in curing vaginiamus.

Little about vaginismus
Vaginismus refer to the condition where there is involuntary vaginal tightness which is caused by contractions of the pelvic floor muscles that surround the vagina.

This contraction or painful spasm is triggered by any stimulation near the vagina or even thought of any form of vaginal penetration.

The overriding emotion is fear of penetration, and this results in sweating, nausea and vomiting. The cause of the problem can be specific at times, like sexually molestation as child or young adult.

Nearly 6 percent of women worldwide suffer from vaginismus.