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Fried fish may be linked to high mortality in stroke belt--study

After studying the participants for 4 years, the researchers found that Americans living in the stroke belt area were 30 percent more likely to consume two or more servings of fried fish compared to those living in other regions.

Among other reasons contributing to deaths from stroke across the 'stroke belt' states, eating fried fish may be one of them, a new study finds.

The latest findings published in the 'Neurology,' a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, states that people living in the 'stroke belt' states consume more fried fish than those living in the other parts of the nation.

'Stroke belt' is a popular term for states of southeastern U.S., as they have a higher stroke mortality rate.

These are Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

Also, the researchers state that residents in the stroke buckle were 17 percent less likely to consume two or more servings of fish with fatty acids in a week, as recommended by the American Heart Association, compared to people in other parts of the state.

21675 Americans accessed
For the 'Reasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke' (REGARDS) study, a team of researchers from Emory University’s School of Medicine analyzed 21675 people across the nation between January 2003 and October 2007.

The average age of the respondents was 65 years.

All the participants were interviewed over the phone and they also took an in-home physical examination.

The study subjects were questioned about how often they ate fried and non-fried fish.

Of all the participants, 21 percent were from the stroke buckle, the three south-eastern states: Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina with extremely high stroke mortality rate, 34 percent were from rest of the stroke belt states, and 44 percent were from other states.

Fish consumption patterns explain high stroke rate?
After studying the participants for 4 years, the researchers found that Americans living in the stroke belt area were 30 percent more likely to consume two or more servings of fried fish compared to those living in other regions.

Also, the researchers stated that residents in the stroke buckle were 17 percent less likely to consume two or more servings of fish with fatty acids in a week, as recommended by the American Heart Association, compared to people in other parts of the state.

Studies done in the past have proved that consuming fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids lowers the risk of heart attack.

Further, compared to whites, African-Americans were almost three times more likely to eat fried fish in a week.

On basis of the findings, Fadi Nahab, M.D., of Emory University, and lead author of the study concluded, “These differences in fish consumption may be one of the potential reasons for the racial and geographic differences in stroke incidence and mortality.”