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Adobe to give employees free Android phones running Flash 10.1

Microsoft too jumped into Apple-Adobe war on Thursday stating that Flash does make it easy for the customers to access video content on the web but the software does have some flaws in it.

Adobe Systems confirmed on Thursday that soon it will be distributing free Google Android phones, powered with Adobe’s new mobile version of Flash 10.1, among its employees, to promote the use of Android phones and its Flash software.

Adobe, reportedly, took this decision because of Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs, who had recently criticized Adobe’s Flash in an open letter.

However, sources familiar with matter said that it’s still not clear as of now whether Adobe’s 8,600 employees will be getting a HTC’s phones or Nexus One.

Adobe is gearing up to officially launch Flash 10.1 platform for Android phones at upcoming Google’s I/O conference in May.

Reportedly, even Google is planning to give away attendees at the conference either a Nexus One or a Motorola Droid device.

So far Adobe is trying to keep its plans under wraps and company’s spokesperson refused the request to comment.

Jobs attack on Abode
Recently, Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs, who’s known for his frankness, posted an essay titled “Thoughts on Flash” on company’s official website in which he stated that Adobe’s Flash is unreliable and battery-hogging software not meant for touch-screens.

Jobs did not stop there and went on to call Adobe “lazy” and Flash “buggy.”

However, sources familiar with matter said that it’s still not clear as of now whether Adobe’s 8,600 employees will be getting a HTC’s phones or Nexus One.

"Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven — they say we want to protect our App Store — but in reality it is based on technology issues," Jobs wrote.

To this, Adobe Systems CEO Shantanu Narayen said in a statement that Jobs accusations about excessive battery usage due to Flash software are “patently false.”

However, analysts keeping close eye on Apple-Adobe drama believe that at the end of the day only customers decides what they want in their devices.

"But at the end of the day, it won't be Apple or Adobe that decides how important this is, it will be consumers. Right now consumers seem perfectly happy buying Apple mobile devices that don't supply Flash,” believes Michael Gartenberg at the Altimeter Group, a consulting firm in San Mateo.

Microsoft supports Apple’s views on Abode
Microsoft too jumped into Apple-Adobe war on Thursday stating that Flash does make it easy for the customers to access video content on the web but the software does have some flaws in it.

"Flash does have some issues, particularly around reliability, security and performance," said Dean Hachamovitch, general manager for the Internet Explorer browser at Microsoft.

But unlike Apple, Microsoft’s approach towards Adobe is not all out offensive.
Hachamovitch said that they are closely working with Adobe’s Flash engineers to help fix the problem causing bugs in the product.

Apple on the other hand has banned Flash from its iPhone and iPad devices.