Money Matters - Simplified

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Finance

3 Stocks That Blew the Market Away


Every week, I take a look at three companies that beat market expectations, since I believe that's the biggest factor in a stock beating the market. Leaving Wall Street's pros with stunned expressions can be a good thing. It usually means that the companies have more in the tank than analysts figured. Capital appreciation typically follows.

Synta Pharma CEO Trumpets New Top Cancer Drug


Synta Pharmaceuticals (Nasdaq: SNTA) has been climbing back from one of the Boston area's highest-profile clinical trial failures of 2009. And a big part of the Lexington, MA-based company's recovery has been to learn from the failure and advance other drug candidates in its pipeline.

What Investors Think About PriceSmart


Together, we are all trying to build our fortune by finding well-run companies at bargain-basement prices. But it takes work -- scouring company earnings reports, scrutinizing key data, and assessing the competition.

What Investors Think About KB Home


Together, we are all trying to build our fortune by finding well-run companies at bargain-basement prices. But it takes work -- scouring company earnings reports, scrutinizing key data, and assessing the competition.

What Investors Think About FactSet Research Systems


Together, we are all trying to build our fortune by finding well-run companies at bargain-basement prices. But it takes work -- scouring company earnings reports, scrutinizing key data, and assessing the competition.

Life Partners Holdings: Warming Up or Cooling Off?


Together, we are all trying to build our fortune by finding well-run companies at bargain-basement prices. But it takes work -- scouring company earnings reports, scrutinizing key data, and assessing the competition.

Helen of Troy Limited: Warming Up or Cooling Off?


Together, we are all trying to build our fortune by finding well-run companies at bargain-basement prices. But it takes work -- scouring company earnings reports, scrutinizing key data, and assessing the competition.

$100 bill gets a new look

Washington -- The U.S. Treasury has a new $100 bill ready for circulation, the first remake of the C-note since 1996.

The new bill was to debut at a ceremony in the Cash Room at the Treasury Wednesday morning, CNN reported.

The Treasury said a month ago the $100 bill needed upgrades to stay ahead of counterfeiters.

The $100 bill is the highest value denomination in general circulation and is widely used overseas.

Copyright 2010 United Press International

Group calls for action on financial reform

Berlin-- Global anti-corruption group Transparency International called for a focus on financial reform among Group of 20 leaders meeting in Washington this week.

"The time to act is now. It has been two years since the onset of the financial crisis and the critically needed reforms to protect the general pubic from fraud must be fully implemented," Transparency Chairwoman Huguette Labelle said in a statement.

Four days after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission charged financial giant Goldman Sachs with fraud, Transparency said, "In the face of mounting evidence of financial fraud … Group of 20 should swiftly implement financial reforms that ensure ethical corporate governance of financial institutions."

Blame in front row at Lehman hearing

Washington -- Regulators, bankers and the U.S. financial system received shares of blame in Washington as a Congressional panel reviewed the collapse of Lehman Brothers.

In an opening statement at a House Financial Services hearing, Rep. Paul Kanjorski, D-Pa., said the investment bank's collapse was "another massive corporate failure," that "reveals that Wall Street executives continued to embellish the truth, tell half-truths and hide behind their power in the marketplace."

Kanjorski also said the autopsy of Lehman Brothers compiled by Anton Valukas showed regulators "failed to uncover wrongdoing, mismanagement, and capital shortfalls even as they fiddled in Lehman's offices."